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Love your artwork: Feng Shui

While rearranging my living room I came across some pretty interesting articles about Feng Shui, a more than 3000 year old philosophy that teaches you how your surroundings can influence your luck. I figured why not try it?

While reading I found some articles about what wallart can do for you in your home. The advice they give on what to look for in the artwork, the colors and advice on hanging them. Since I make custom art this could be of interest for anyone looking for a wall art of their dog that does resonate with the Feng Shui philosophy.

 

First: let's start with the colors. I always ask what the clients favorite colors are, but with Feng Shui it's better to look at what you need in your life, so you can pick a color that gives you that vibe. Invite certain energies. Colors can make a big impact in your home. For example red invokes fire energy for passion, recognition and visibility. When people ask me why I am still single I can now tell them it's not my horrible personality but the lack of red color in my interior. Already love this Feng Shui, wonderful. 

 

Second: they advice to avoid art that is emotionally charged, like stuff that belonged to an ex, or something else that you started to dislike over the years. Let it go! Order a custom one.

 

Third: don't hang your art to low, the energy will also be low. Hang the artwork at the appropriate height for the space and the size of the piece. If you are feeling down and defeated, don't blame that awful date but check if your paintings are high enough! Consider the scale of your home or the space you are adding the artwork to. If you place a small size artwork on a big wall you might get a feeling there is something missing in your life. Don't be afraid to mix different colors, sizes and/or shapes.

 

Fourth: Take your time when you begin collecting art. There is no need to rush. Be selective. Be sure the artwork resonates with you and that you love what you look at. How does the artwork make you feel? Does it support you or bring you down? Pick your art slowly and mindfully! Or better: get a custom one.

 

Fifth: in general the following subjects should better be avoided in your wall art:

  • Single and lonely looking people, especially in the bedroom;
  • Violent Imagery;
  • Family photo's in the bedroom;

 

Sixth: think of the animals you would like to add with your dog in the custom artwork. Did you know that dragons, phoenixes, tigers and tortoises make up the four celestial animals of feng Shui? Next to your dog's energy,  they can contribute to the luck in your home.

 

There is a lot more interesting stories I read about Feng Shui. Wonder what you think about it or have experienced. Please a message below to share!

To get a custom art send me an email: info@digitalpetart.com .

 

Greetings Jessica.

 

 

 

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What is digital art?

 

What is digital art?

Digital art is an artistic work or practice that uses digital technology as part of the creative or presentation process. Since the 1970s, various names have been used to describe the process, including computer art and multi media art. Digital art is itself placed under the larger umbrella term ' new media art'. Artworks are considered digital paintings when created in similar fashion to non-digital paintings, but using software on a computer platform and digitally outputting the resulting image as painted on a canvas.

 

The first use of the term digital art was in the early 1980s when computer engineers devised a paint program which was used by the pioneering digital artist Harold Cohen This became known as AARON, a robotic machine designed to make large drawings on sheets of paper placed on the floor. Since this early foray into artificial intelligence, Cohen continued to fine-tune the AARON program as technology becomes more sophisticated.
 

Mixed portraits and rough portraits (that are made in my studio next to the digital classic art I make) are mixed media: digitally altered. This means the portrait you send in will first be optimized and digitally altered. There is no painting in this process, but composing and filtering.

Digital illustration 

Digital illustration or computer illustration is the use of digital tools to produce images under the direct manipulation of the artist, usually through a pointing device such as a tablet or a mouse. It is distinguished from computer-generated art, which is produced by a computer using mathematical models created by the artist. It is also distinct from digital manipulation of photographs, in that it is an original construction "from scratch". (Photographic elements may be incorporated into such works, but they are not necessarily the primary basis

 

Background of my art

Anthropomorphism (making an object or animal look human) has been greatly discussed and there has been a lot of research done about it. Making something look human gives comfort because it's recognizable. A lot of marketing campaigns are build on this principle (think of the little round chocolate couple with the two m's) and your whole childhood you've seen talking animals in series and movies.
Giving human trades to animals has also been good for the welfare of animals; studies show that people are more willing to help them in situations of distress because of anthropomorphism. 

for more info visit the art studio: www.digitalpetart.com

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Crying Boy: the urban legend

Urban legends: The Curse of The Crying-Boy

 

 

One of the Crying-Boy paintings by Bragolin.

Crying-Boy and the urban legend of this piece of art

The legend of the crying-boy painting has been going around for a long time. In de eighties some firemen discovered that a lot of fires started in houses that had the Bragolin painting of Crying-Boy, these are paintings of young boys...crying. The artworks bear the prominent signature of one Giovanni Bragolin. Rumors abounded that he painted hundreds of crying children, many of them street urchins, in either Italy or Spain. 

One of the models he painted was a boy named Don Bonillo, who accidentally started a fire in which his parents died in Spain. From then on, wherever the boy went, a fire followed, prompting his nickname, Diablo. In the 1970s the boy was consumed by fire as well, in an explosion caused by a car accident.

 

Jane McCutchin, who had hung the print in her living room in the 1980s, was cleaning her kitchen when she found that her hand-made drapes, blinds and curtains were suddenly ablaze. Her family escaped alive, but her home had been destroyed—except for a single painting hung in her living room, of the crying boy. “You could still see the little boy’s face on the painting,” she said. Later, she heard a firefighter who saw the painting say: “Oh no, not another.” 

Most of the fires had normal causes, like cigarettes, or unwieldy deep-frying pans. Since most of the myth surrounds the nearly unbelievable fire resistance of the painting, the materials of the prints have been tested. Because it was printed on a compressed board and had been treated with a varnish that was fire retardant, it was explainable that the paintings seem to survive the fires. 

Still, the urban legend of The Crying-Boy remains.

 

 

My Crying-Dog painting is printed on cardboard and comes with a fire extinguisher, better safe then sorry. See the artworks: www.digitalpetart.com/ Classicart What do you think of this Urban Legend? Would you dare to buy a Crying-Boy painting? 

 

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CDC pets and corona

Corona and pets: info CDC

 

 

Here is the latest information from CDC about corona and pets. (Updated mid June 2020.)

 

If You Have Pets

 

What you need to know

  • A small number of pets worldwide, including cats and dogs, have been reportedexternal icon to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after close contact with people with COVID-19.
  • Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low.
  • It appears that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread from people to animals in some situations.
  • Treat pets as you would other human family members – do not let pets interact with people outside the household.
  • If a person inside the household becomes sick, isolate that person from everyone else, including pets.
  • This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

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For more information on COVID and Animals

See COVID-19 and Animals and COVID-19 and Animals Frequently Asked Questions.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people, while others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels, and bats. Some coronaviruses, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, infect only animals and do not infect humans.

 

Risk of people spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to pets

We are still learning about the virus that causes COVID-19, but it appears that it can spread from people to animals in some situations. A small number of pets worldwide, including cats and dogs, have been reported

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 to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after close contact with people with COVID-19.

Infected pets might get sick or they might not have any symptoms. Of the pets that have gotten sick, most only had mild illness and fully recovered.

 

What to do if you own pets

 

Until we learn more about how this virus affects animals, treat pets as you would other human family members to protect them from a possible infection.

Because there is a small risk that people with COVID-19 could spread the virus to animals, CDC recommends that pet owners limit their pet’s interaction with people outside their household.

  • Keep cats indoors when possible and do not let them roam freely outside.
  • Walk dogs on a leash at least 6 feet (2 meters) away from others.
  • Avoid public places where a large number of people gather.
  • Do not put face coverings on pets. Covering a pet’s face could harm them.

There is no evidence that the virus can spread to people from the skin, fur, or hair of pets. Do not wipe or bathe your pet with chemical disinfectants, alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, or any other products not approved for animal use.

Talk to your veterinarian if your pet gets sick or if you have any concerns about your pet’s health.

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Questions about keeping your pet safe?

See Frequently Asked Questions about Animals and COVID-19.

Protect pets if you are sick

If you are sick with COVID-19 (either suspected or confirmed by a test), you should restrict contact with your pets and other animals, just like you would with people. Until we know more about this virus, people sick with COVID-19 should avoid contact with pets and other animals.

  • When possible, have another member of your household care for your pets while you are sick.
  • Avoid contact with your pet including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, sharing food, and sleeping in the same bed.
  • If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wear a cloth face covering and wash your hands before and after you interact with them.

 

If you are sick with COVID-19 and your pet becomes sick, do not take your pet to the veterinary clinic yourself. Call your veterinarian and let them know you have been sick with COVID-19. Some veterinarians may offer telemedicine consultations or other plans for seeing sick pets. Your veterinarian can evaluate your pet and determine the next steps for your pet’s treatment and care.

For more information visit: What to Do if You are Sick.

Stay healthy around animals

In the United States, there is no evidence that animals are playing a significant role in the spread of COVID-19.  Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. However, because all animals can carry germs that can make people sick, it’s always a good idea to practice healthy habits around pets and other animals.

  • Wash your hands after handling animals, their food, waste, or supplies.
  • Practice good pet hygiene and clean up after pets properly.
  • Talk to your veterinarian if you have questions about your pet’s health.
  • Be aware that children 5 years of age and younger, people with weakened immune systems, and people 65 years of age and older are more likely to get sick from germs some animals can carry.

For more information, visit CDC’s COVID-19 and Animals webpage and Healthy Pets, Healthy People website.

Guidance and recommendations

 

More Information

Top of Page

COVID-19 and Animals

Other LanguagesPrint Page

Updated June 15, 2020

 

What you need to know

  • We do not know the exact source of the current outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but we know that it originally came from an animal source.
  • At this time, there is no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low.
  • More studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19.
  • We are still learning about this virus, but it appears that it can spread from people to animals in some situations.

For more information, see COVID-19 and Animals Frequently Asked Questions. Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some coronaviruses cause cold-like illnesses in people, while others cause illness in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels, and bats. Some coronaviruses, such as canine and feline coronaviruses, infect only animals and do not infect humans.

 

Risk of animals spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to people

Some coronaviruses that infect animals can sometimes be spread to humans and then spread between people, but this is rare. This is what happened with the virus that caused the current outbreak of COVID-19. However, we do not know the exact source of this virus yet. Public health officials and partners are working hard to identify the source of COVID-19. The first reported infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person to person.

The virus that causes COVID-19 spreads mainly from person to person through respiratory droplets from coughing, sneezing, and talking. Recent studies show that people who are infected but do not have symptoms likely also play a role in the spread of COVID-19. At this time, there is no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. More studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19.

 

Risk of people spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to animals

 

The first US case of an animal testing positive for COVID-19 was a tiger at a NY zoo.

We are still learning about this virus, but it appears that it can spread from people to animals in some situations, especially after close contact with a person sick with COVID-19.

For information on how to protect pets from possible infection with SARS-CoV-2, see If You Have Pets.

 

Animals that can be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19

We know that cats, dogs, and a few other types of animals can be infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, but we don’t yet know all of the animals that can get infected. There have been reports of animals being infected with the virus worldwide.

  • A small number of pet cats and dogs have been reported to be infected with the virus in several countries, including the United States. Most of these pets became sick after contact with people with COVID-19.
  • Several lions and tigersexternal icon
    at a New York zoo tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 after showing signs of respiratory illness. Public health officials believe these large cats became sick after being exposed to a zoo employee who was infected with SARS-CoV-2. All of these large cats have fully recovered.
  • SARS-CoV-2 was recently discovered in mink (which are closely related to ferrets) on multiple farms in the Netherlands. The mink showed respiratory and gastrointestinal signs; the farms also experienced an increase in mink deaths. Because some workers on these farms had symptoms of COVID-19, it is likely that infected farm workers were the source of the mink infections. Some farm cats on several mink farms also developed antibodies to this virus, suggesting they had been exposed to the virus at some point. Officials in the Netherlands are investigating the connections between the health of people and animals as well as the environment on these mink farms.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) maintains a list

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of all animals with confirmed infections with SARS-CoV-2 in the United States.

Research on animals and COVID-19

Research on SARS-Cov-2 in animals is limited, but studies are underway to learn more about how this virus can affect different animals.

  • Recent research shows that ferrets, cats, and golden Syrian hamsters can be experimentally infected with the virus and can spread the infection to other animals of the same species in laboratory settings.
  • A number of studies have investigated non-human primates as models for human infection. Rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques, African green monkeys, and common marmosets can become infected SARS-CoV-2 and become sick in a laboratory setting.
  • Mice, pigs, chickens, and ducks do not seem to become infected or spread the infection based on results from these studies.
  • Data from one study suggest dogs are not as easily infected with the virus as cats and ferrets.

These findings were based on a small number of animals, and do not show whether animals can spread infection to people. More studies are needed to understand if and how different animals could be affected by COVID-19.

 

Guidance and recommendations

More Information

Media Announcements

 

This information comes directly from the CDC website and is not mine, but we should all share this information to stay safe! You and your pets.

 

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Can the photoshop artist be real?

Can the Photoshop artists be real?

 

Can the Photoshop artists be real? The difference between hand illustrated and filters.

So lately the custom dog art has been a booming business. Big companies are selling custom portraits of people's pets. It is a large market and it is real fun that in these days you can have a customized artwork of your pet ordering from the internet.

What bothers me (and of course there is something bothering me, otherwise I wouldn't make a blog out of it) is the unfair advertisement that comes with these art works. 

Let me give you an example of what you can find on the internet: ' It's never been easier to have a commissioned piece of pet art in your home! (Company name) petportraits are hand-illustrated by our digital artists based on the  ...'  

When looking at the art works I immediately see that these are not hand-illustrated, these are made with a simple filter called ' cut out'. So what they do is take your photo and throw over a filter. That is a job done in five minutes, if you are a little driven in Photoshop three. To show you the difference between a hand illustrated work of art and a filtered see my website: www.digitalpetart.com/classicart

 

Then there are the renaissance paintings that the heads are glued on, thrown over a filter that in most cases doesn't resemble the costume's colors and structure that they glued the head on...I find these artworks a little distressing personally. It's like a floating head. I like Stephen King books and aren't afraid of a little horror but even these creep me out..

It's ok they use these filters, of course. The art work looks ok from a distance, nothing wrong with it if you want a good laugh.. but.. do not advertise saying it's hand illustrated! The hand illustrated pieces that I make take me about 4-6 hours, excluded the time it takes to make the custom design and the constant communication with my clients. Every pixel in my artworks is painted, added details for my clients to enjoy. 

For them to claim their art works are hand made confuses people and is misleading. If they mean with ' hand made'  they selected a filter with their hand, but that is not what they are implying. If I would buy a dress from a fashion designer and she says it's hand stitched I know I pay for the quality and time there is put in this dress, that makes it more custom and more of a reason for me to love it. That dress would be special. If it turns out to be fabricated in a factory together with a 1000 more...how would I feel? Same goes for these art works. 

There is a market for these filtered arts and that is ok. Makers go for the quick fabrication to make money, but they shouldn't claim things to make people pay more. If people have a small budget I offer to make a filtered art for them, but I am real about it. 

Be clear about what you design and the time you put in and base a fair price on that. Be real. I know my clients appreciate realness, I am sure their clients would, too.

 

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Anthropomorphism in art

Pixel Pet Art » Blog » Anthropomorphism in art

Anthropomorphism in art

Published on 25 February 2020 at 01:22

 

 

 

A few months back I read an article by an art expert that claimed that anthropomorphism was something that was not done in the renaissance time, that in those days they respected their dogs to much to dress them up like that, followed by a link to a website that does paintings of dogs in renaissance clothes... 

The Facts.

First of all there is nothing disrespectful about anthropomorphism. On the contrary: making an object or animal look human is something humans did even in the Stone Age. It is comforting and recognizable and doesn't do any harm to the subject or animal, it's flattering we try to see similarities to feel more connected. There are whole marketing campaigns based on anthropomorphism and a lot of studies done about it concluding it's a positive phenomenon.

Quoting Wikipedia: 'Anthropomorphism may be beneficial to the welfare of animals. A 2012 study by Butterfield found that utilizing anthropomorphic language when describing dogs created a greater willingness to help them in situations of distress.Previous studies have shown that individuals who attribute human characteristics to animals are less willing to eat them, and that the degree to which individuals perceive minds in other animals predicts the moral concern afforded to them. It is possible that anthropomorphism leads humans to like non-humans more when they have apparent human qualities, since perceived similarity has been shown to increase prosocial behavior toward other humans.'

Infrahumanisation

The problem starts when you start infrahumanisation, when you see a human less human, like me seeing the art expert a little less of an expert and a little more as a dumb cow. As an example.

Second thing of what bothered me about the article was the claim that these paintings were not done in the renaissance time. They were. They were even done on rock paintings in the pre-historic age. A quick Google search and you'll see.

Sponsored content

Third thing and what may have bothered me most is that this article was clearly sponsored by the art company he mentioned, he linked to their webpage and put a photo of this company on his blog, without mentioning this was advertisement. By writing a 'critical' article he might have hoped we would not have noticed, but he was clearly infrahumanising us, thinking we were the dumb cows and we didn't notice he got sponsored... 

Let's enjoy our dogs painted as funny and recognizable, let's enjoy this art form and celebrate it, it's of all decades!

 
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Blog about Van Gogh

 

Inspired by van Gogh

Considered one of the greatest Dutch painters, Vincent van Gogh was a post-impressionist artist whose work highly influenced 20th-century art. His work depicting figures, light, and landscape is notable for its beauty and emotion. Several of van Gogh’s paintings rank among the most expensive in the world.

The attraction he felt toward troubled women, turned his love life into a fiasco; the love he felt for others made him gave away his worldly goods to prove he is a good Christian. He lived desperately poor and lost his hope for human affection, so drawing and painting became van Gogh’s means of channeling his depression.

Van Gogh lived a short and tumultuous life and struggled with mental illness. During one of his seizures, he cut off his left earlobe.

He was a great artist who had a way with words as well, he wrote long letters to his brother, with whom he had a very close bond.

There is a book called: The letters of Vincent van Gogh.

 

"What would life be if we had no courage to attempt anything?" 

 

Some of van Gogh most famous paintings:

Almond Blossom (1890)

Wheat Field with Cypresses (1889)

The potato Eaters (1885)

Irises (1889)

Sunflowers (1888)

The starry night (1889)

 

 

"I try more and more to be myself, caring relatively little whether people approve or disapprove."

 

What inspires me about Vincent van Gogh?

He stood up for his art, even when he only sold one in his whole life he continued to paint and draw. He got rejected a lot but that didn't keep him from doing what he loved most. 

He wasn't money driven and in his own words was a sheep compared to the wolves out there. 

His letters to his brother, who he loved deeply, are amazing. Describing things very clear, struggling with things that people can relate to. Next to a good painter he also was a great story teller. 

 

"There is nothing more truly artistic than to love people."

 

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Pets in art funfacts!

Here are some pets in art funfacts!

Pablo Picasso, the well known Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist and stage designer had a little dachshund named Lump, that he adored. Picasso described Lumps as: ' not a dog, he's not a little man, he's somebody else'. They died within ten days from each other in 1973.

Photo courtesy of David Douglas Duncan, who was the previous owner of Lump, but when he took him to Pablo picasso, Picasso fell in love and mr. Duncan gave Lump to him. What a gorgeous story.
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Digital versus canvas

Digital versus Canvas

Published on 30 March 2019 at 10:03

 

Digital and canvas paintings.

 
 

I had a great afternoon looking at the artwork and making some photo's in Roel's amazing workplace. I admire his work very much. He has his own brandname: Studio Bambergen, next to digital paintings he makes video's and photo's. Thank you Roel for the lovely afternoon!

Today I went to Carre in Tilburg to visit a friend, Roel Sloot who is a great painter, in his working studio. He paints on canvas, totally different from a digital painting.
Both kind of ' painting'  techniques have there own pro's en con's, but are really totally different art forms!
 
 
 

Let me start with some pro's of painting digitally:

 
-less of a mess. My working table is very clean. I don't need to change my clothing when I start painting. No tubes laying around and no dirty brushes.
 
-Painting a scene from a photo can go directly on the photo so in most cases it looks more realistic... (depending on the artist too..) great when you work with clients portraits that need to be very realistic!
 
- When things aren't going the way you planned you just delete and start over, no painting over canvas or needing a new one.
 
-You can work on a lot of pieces at the same time, you don't need any room to store your other works.
 
-You can work on your digital file wherever you want, just bring your laptop with photoshop.
 
-Adding new stuff to your painting is easier since you just put together your layers.
 
-Your client can print the artwork in any size they want on any material they want.
 
-They can use the file for social media and websites, next to prints.
 
 
 
 

Those are a lot of pro's, but working on canvas has a lot of pro's too:

 
- You get texture, texture can give a lot of depth and more coulour effects in a paining.
 
-There is only one original. With a digital file you know the artist still has one.
 
-There is a nostalgic feeling to it.
 
-You don't work behind a computer screen, better for your eyes!
 
-Mixing the colors is more challenging, but also more rewarding when it turns out the way you want it.
 
-You are not depending on a computer or photoshop, so no system to break down, no tears when you didn't save. (Yes...been there...)
 
-The whole setting has got a nice feel to it, better than just a computer screen.
 
-You see what you get when it comes to colors, digital it all depends on the calibration of the screen and afterwards the quality of the print.
 
There are a lot more differences but these are the ones I came up with.
 
Digital artwork is in no comparison to painting on canvas really, two totally different art forms.
 
I had a great afternoon looking at the artwork and making some photo's in Roel's amazing workplace. I admire his work very much. He has his own brandname: Studio Bambergen, next to digital paintings he makes video's and photo's. Thank you Roel for the lovely afternoon!
 
 
For more information on digital paintings see my website: www.digitalpetart.com

 

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Love your artwork: Feng Shui

While reading I found some articles about what wallart can do for you in your home. The advice they give on what to look for in the artwork, the colors and advice on hanging them. Since I make custom art this could be of interest for anyone looking for a wall art of their dog that does resonate with the Feng Shui philosophy.

Read more »

Pets in art funfacts!

Pablo Picasso, the well known Spanish painter, sculptor, printmaker, ceramicist and stage designer had a little dachshund named Lump, that he adored. Picasso described Lumps as: ' not a dog, he's not a little man, he's somebody else'. They died within ten days from each other in 1973.

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dog caricatures